Scientific Program

Day 1 :

Keynote Forum

GUZUN-COJOCARU Tatiana

General Director Sarl Techi Garu Solutions | France

Keynote: Alternative processes for low moisture food - versatility and challenge

Time : 10:00 -10:40

Biography:

Dr. Tatiana Guzun-Cojocaru - after earning her M.S. degree in Chemical Engineering and Science at Moldova State University in 2003, she worked for 2 years as Research Engineer in the Physical and Organic Chemistry Department of the Polytechnic Institute of Moldova State University in Chisinau with main researches in synthesis and characterization of active compounds used as biocides or against cancer. In 2005, she won the French Government Scholarship that allowed her to follow a PhD in Food Science and Technology at the High National Institute of Applied Biology in Nutrition and Food (ENSBANA-Dijon, Burgundy University). After obtaining her PhD diploma, articulated on Iron Fortification of Milk and Dairy products, she worked for 2 years as an Assistant Lecturer and Researcher in Applied Food Chemistry and Biochemistry fields in the Food Science Department for the same institution. Then, in 2010 she joined ETIA Company, as R&D Manager for the Food division, where in 2015, she was nominated General Director. In same period she was Lecture Assistant in Paris East University. In January 2018, Tatiana Guzun-Cojocaru founded Techni Grau Solutions Ltd.

Today her area of expertise is: risk assessment, thermal and non-thermal methods and machineries specialized in proposing technical and technological solutions exactly per customer needs in food and pharma industries. Already having few patents in these sectors.

 

Abstract:

Conventional production of low moisture food (spices, herbs, blends, ingredients…) implicates a number of hygienic problems, which can pose tremendous risks for farmers, producers and consumers. Furthermore, food quality may also be adversely affected. Only few technologies exist for the sanitation of spices, however, some applications such as fumigation or irradiation with ethylene oxide are restricted or even banded by law in the European Union (EU). As consequence, it is imperative to develop innovative technologies for the production of high quality spices (less VO loss, moisture and color changing). Since the use of the ethylene oxide has been banned and the consumers do not accept irradiation, steam treatment is extensively used not only in the EU nations, but also worldwide. This last technique can be in batch or continuous way and involves steam at various temperature levels for whole spices, before grinding, or ground spices, after grinding. In our days the producer is looking for versatile technologies, which will allow the production of spices with various characteristics (microbiological safe, taste, color, texture…), but also with multifunctional applications such as disinfestation or mycotoxins reduction without any risk assessment. That is why discovering this type of technologies became a challenge for the companies working in this field.

 

Keynote Forum

Vincent Doumeizel

Vice President - Food & Sustainability | Lloyd’s Register |United Kingdom

Keynote: How innovation and disruptive technologies should drive safety along the food supply chain

Time : 10:40-11:20

Biography:

With the population set to reach 8.5bn by 2030, food organizations are exploring new technologies to ensure safe and sustainable supply chains. Lack of offer could not only spark strong social tensions across the world but could result in corruption and spiraling costs for the most simple of food stuffs, meaning that only the wealthy could afford to put food in their mouths. To meet client requirements, Food industry will have to blend conventional assessment with digital monitoring and audit solutions that will enable the delivery of real-time assurance and insight, but also researching alternative food sources to feed the expanding population. The presentation will explore blockchains, NGS, drones, remote audits, and others to look at how the recent innovation in data and life science will impact the risks in the food safety & sustainability. The food supply chain is very fragmented with billions of operators meaning that the risk associated with the supply chain is traditionally high. Through this lack of transparency, there is ultimately a strong risk to completely disconnect people from their food. Resilience implies flexibility and agility and the establishment of more collaborative supply chain relationships based on a far greater transparency of information. New IT tools and platforms, notably the emergence of Distributed Ledgers (blockchains) mean that collaborative working is becoming possible. Today’s consumers are savvy; they know what they want to eat and what is good for them. What they choose to buy, their decisions have a direct impact on their health, their society, the planet, local communities, forest, farming, water and our climate – both tomorrow and in the future. The convergence of very demanding & educated customers with disruptive technologies including both data & life sciences will totally revolution the food industry in order to enable a more sustainable and safer supply chain.

 

Abstract:

Following a degree in economics, Vincent worked for the French government in Africa and Middle East on a number of agriculture projects; Vincent Doumeizel joined in 2014 Lloyds Register, the world’s leading provider of independent assessment, as Vice President for Food & Sustainability at group level serving over 100+ countries and thousands of clients. Vincent also supports actively the charitable objectives of the Lloyd’s Register Foundation (LRF), notably through the identification & funding of innovative projects to mitigate food insecurity as well as through participation to Advisory Boards in various universities projects across Europe. He is actively involved in exploring the impact of blockchains on the food supply chain and has contributed to the latest LRF Foresight Reviews of Distributed Ledgers as well as the one of Resilience Engineering.  Vincent is also a regular speaker at some of the world’s leading events including COP (United Nations) & the Global Food Safety Conference.

 

Keynote Forum

Manuel Jesús Palma Astudillo

Head of Innovation and Development in Molino La Estampa | Chile

Keynote: Functional ingredients in the food industry in Latin America

Time : 11:40-12:20

Biography:

Manuel Palma has a Ph. D in Nutrition and Food, master’s in food sciences, MBA and Master in Innovation (c). He has experience in the development of functional ingredients from agro-industrial waste and stabilization through microencapsulation. He worked as a researcher at the University of Chile for 5 years, to later continue his professional career as a head in R&D in companies in the area of lipids and bakery, where he has developed projects which help in the prevention of diabetes, improvements in absorption of micronutrients, replacement of ingredients through the use of enzymes and obtaining economic resources for the execution of R&D projects.

Abstract:

Latin America has experienced a significant economic development in recent years, however, the Region is characterized by a wide variation in economic development and purchasing power and different health problems which are associated with eating habits, lifestyle, geographical barriers, among others. In this context, the food industry in Latin America is facing different sociocultural changes which has led to the emergence of a new type of consumer, concerned to find food that not only nutritional, but to help in the prevention of diseases, which comply with environmental regulations and be accessible to purchase. The use of functional ingredients incorporated in food matrices is an opportunity to innovate, generating improvements from the environmental point of view since it is possible to obtain functional ingredients from agro-industrial waste which has functional properties and helps to prevent and/or improve chronic diseases (diabetes, hypertension, cancer, etc.). However, the functional ingredients present a high cost, are susceptible to degradation, change the concentration according to the source of origin and are difficult to incorporate into food matrices. It is necessary to develop technologies which allow them to stabilize and be protected from a variety of adverse conditions. Although we already have a wide range of functional ingredients, the food industry is not prepared for their use and incorporation into the value chain, because functional ingredients have a high cost and the food industry is only looking for economically viable ingredients and products without a real concern for the health problems in the Latin American populations. It is necessary to have a structural and mental change that allows the food industry to reconsider and understand its importance in generating products that create an impact on the population health, generating products that go beyond merely the commercial aspects and generate a change in the quality of life of consumers.

 

Speaker
Biography:

Prof. Chauhan obtained Ph.D. in Dairy Science and Technology. Currently, Dr. Chauhan working as Coordinator and Professor (Food Technology) at Centre of Food Science and Technology, Institute of Agricultural Sciences, Banaras Hindu University and also Director of Centre of Advanced Faculty Training (CAFT- Food Processing) ICAR, Gov. of India, BHU Centre. Dr. Chauhan is President of AFST (I), Varanasi chapter and life member of different professional scientific societies as well as secretary general International College of Nutrition Alberta (Canada).  Dr. Chauhan also had been a visiting scientist in University of Copenhagen, Denmark, Wageningen University and PTC+ Oenkerk, The Netherlands. Dr. Chauhan also acts as a Chaired and Co-Chaired the Scientific Technical Committee in various International and National conferences at Malaysia, Thailand, Budapest, (Hungry) and National University Fiji etc. He has over 100 publications that have been cited over 223 times.

 

Abstract:

The developed sugar free biscuit was fortified with fenugreek seed powder and stevia was used as the natural sweetener. The functional component of fenugreek seed powder is trigonelline which is helpful in the production of insulin. In the present research work, 31 trials were performed by taking four factors Viz. Skimmed Milk Powder (SMP), Stevia, Butter, and Fenugreek seed powder and responses were analysed by using Response Surface methodology (RSM) for optimization of developed sugar free biscuits. The composition for manufacturing of sugar free biscuits was 0.5 g to 6.5g SMP, 0.5g to 5.5 g stevia, 10 to 50 g butter and fenugreek seed powder 0.5 to 6.5%. Taking into account, these four factors were optimized by using RSM. The optimized parameters for developed sugar free biscuits includes SMP (1.7727 %), Stevia (4.3485 %), Butter (37.8788 %) and fenugreek seed powder (0.5 %). After optimization of sugar free biscuit, diameter, thickness and spread ratio was recorded as 5.04 cm, 0.82 cm, and 4.92 cm respectively. The final optimized product contains carbohydrate (76.75 %), protein (5.90 %), fat (14.85), ash (~ 1%), moisture (4%) and crude fiber (1.5 %). The colour of sugar free biscuit was recorded by hunter colour flex and the L*, a*, b*, value was 46.40, 12, 20.29, respectively. Fortified sugar free biscuits and refined wheat flour were analysed for pasting properties of starch, gelatinization of starch, peak and final viscosity. Developed sugar free biscuit was rich in calcium and magnesium and their concentration were observed as 294.8mg/100g and 451.5mg/100g respectively by ion chromatography. Atomic absorption spectroscopy of developed sugar free biscuits was also performed for mineral analysis and reported that it contains iron (1.93mg/100g), copper (0.065mg/100g), and zinc (0.325 mg/100g). 

 

 

Speaker
Biography:

Dr. Barthelemy Honfoga is Senior Agricultural Economist and Associate Professor of Marketing and Policy Analysis at the University of Abomey-Calavi, Benin. His research focus is on agricultural market development, including food marketing and food policy analysis, and economics of soil fertility management. He has more than 30 years of R-D experience. He worked with the International Fertilizer Development Centre (IFDC) and the SADAOC Foundation, and did consultancies for international organizations, including FAO, Fairtrade Foundation, FANRPAN, FARA, Michigan State University, etc. He published research papers in renown international journals among which Agricultural and Food Economics. The present paper submitted to Food Science 2018 highlights the importance of consumer choices of marketing services and food attributes, as a critical driver of food demand in food restaurants in cities.

 

 

Abstract:

Since the closing of the public restaurant of the University of Abomey-Calavi for irregular services, high service costs and embezzlement, one should ask whether private street restaurants on the campus are meeting students’ demand for food. Which food attributes and marketing services are highly rated and how do street restaurants compare with the reference restaurant Agro Maquis?  The purpose of this study is to reveal the importance of consumer choices of marketing services and food attributes, as a critical driver of food demand in street restaurants, especially among students on the Campus of University of Abomey-Calavi, Benin. Methodology & Theoretical Orientation: Street restaurants were rated for their food services against those of Agro Maquis restaurant taken as a “reference”. A typology of street restaurants was realized using main component/cluster analysis. Then dominant street restaurants were identified and tested for conformity with the reference restaurant, using mean values of 13 service attributes. Findings: Consumer ratings show that 60-70% of street restaurants comply well with cleanness and attractiveness of the place, about 90% for servicing time/duration, and only 50% for hygiene. Three main types/clusters of restaurants were revealed, covering 71.4% of survey restaurants, with main components among service attributes being fast servicing, attractiveness/tidiness, and availability of change money. Conclusion & Significance: While price accessibility is important, actually the total quality of marketing services is valued. Three types of restaurants were revealed according to fast servicing, attractiveness/tidiness, and easiness of payment/availability of change money as main clustering axes components among 13 service attributes. Only 40% of street restaurants provided food marketing services as good as those of Agro Maquis. With these findings, we raise the Government’s attention on food services outsourcing to independent private restaurants in Universities and State organizations.

 

Speaker
Biography:

Dr. Paul C. Chikezie is a Research Scientist/Lecturer at the Department of Biochemistry, Imo State University, Owerri, Nigeria. DR. PAUL C. CHIKEZIE holds a Bachelor of Science (B.Sc.) degree in Biochemistry, Master of Science (M.Sc.) degree in Medical Biochemistry/Immunochemistry and Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.) degree in Medical Biochemistry, as well as Certificate in Advanced Digital Appreciation. DR. PAUL C. CHIKEZIE has over seventeen (17) years of research and cognitive experience in the academia with one hundred and two (102) scholarly publications, which include scientific articles in reputable international and local learned journals, as well as edited books and book chapter contributions. DR. PAUL C. CHIKEZIE’s research interests encompass clinical enzymology/toxicology, oxidative stress, phytomedicine, food chemistry/nutritional biochemistry, polyphenol oxidases and haemoglobinopathies with emphasis on sickle cell anaemias.   

 

Abstract:

The liver and kidney are organs of homeostasis. Biochemical and histological methods were used to determine functional integrity of renal and hepatic tissues of Wistar rats following the consumption processed cocoa bean-based beverages (PCB-BB) - and raw cocoa bean products (RCBP) - containing diets. Thirty Wistar rats were designated on the basis of experimental diets received for 28 days. At the end of the 28-day experimental feeding duration, blood samples as well as renal and hepatic tissues from the experimental rat groups were measured for functional and histological indices, respectively. Serum ALT activities of the experimental rat groups showed no significant difference (p > 0.05) and were within relatively narrow range of 32.17±4.98 IU/L – 41.00±10.85 IU/L whereas, serum AST activities gave wide variation within the range of 15.67±2.13 IU/L – 34.83±8.31 IU/L; p < 0.05. Serum bilirubin concentrations of experimental rat groups were < 1.0 mg/dL. Serum total protein and albumin concentrations varied within relatively narrow range. Serum creatinine concentration was significantly lower (p < 0.05) than serum urea concentration. Histology showed evidence of moderate disarrangement of hepatic tissues architecture and degenerated tubules and glomerular turfs. The pattern of activity of ALT > AST in serum appeared to correlate with the extent of disarrangement of hepatic tissue architecture. The experimental rat groups did not exhibit hyperbilirubinemia. Also, PCB-BB - and RCBP - containing diets did not substantially interfere with the capacity of the hepatocytes to biosynthesized plasma proteins and the functionality of renal tissues.

 

Speaker
Biography:

Arse Gebeyehu Wod was born on September 12, 1982 and studied my elementary and high school at Ethiopian Adventist Academy. After successful completion of high school I joined Mekelle University in 2002 to study animal science and got my BSc degree after four years.  During my postgraduate study I studied animal production and collected my MSc degree in 2012 from Haramaya University.  I’m senior researcher at Adami Tulu Agricultural Research Center with over 10 years’ experience in meat and dairy animal research. my recent research I studied the microbial load of beef of Arsi Cattle (bos indicus ethiopian breed)

 

Abstract:

The study was conducted in Adama city, on carcass samples collected from the Ethiopian breed called Arsi breed cattle with the objective of evaluating beef microbiological qualities with standard procedures. Carcass samples were randomly chosen at abattoir using systematic random sampling techniques. On the night of carcass sampling about 125 cattle were slaughtered and the carcass samples were chosen on every 10 counting. Beef samples were aseptically excised and collected from all parts of the exposed body of carcasses. The methods described by the Nordic Committee on Food Analysis (NMKL) were adopted to analyze each of the parameters considered. Aerobic plate (AP) count, total coliform (TC) count and fecal coliform FC) counts were significantly different among different sampling days and batches of samples (P<0.05). The mean AP, TC, FC, E. coli and staphylococci counts were 1.62×105, 5.29×101, 9.05×101, 8.97×101 and 5.54×105, respectively. Salmonella and Shigella bacteria were not isolated per 25 g samples. In Adama, carcasses are normally transported to the butchers’ shop either in vans, minibus, taxi, three-wheel motor cycle and horse-cart. This exposes the meat to a number of pathogens some of which may be pathogenic.

 

Speaker
Biography:

Wen-Hao Su is a 4th year Ph.D. candidate at the School of Biosystems and Food Engineering, University College Dublin (UCD), Ireland, and also a visiting academic at the School of Chemical Engineering, university of Birmingham, UK. He mainly engages in the study of food science, spectroscopy, image processing and chemometrics. He completed his undergraduate degree (2012) and graduate degree (2012) both in Food Science and Engineering. Up to now, he has served as the reviewers of several SCI journals (such as Drying Technology, Trends in Food Science & Technology) and published 26 academic papers as the first author, including 12 SCI papers in the peer-review journals including Critical Reviews in Food Science and Nutrition, Comprehensive Reviews in Food Science and Food Safety, Talanta, Journal of Food Engineering, Computers and Electronics in Agriculture. He has also finished two chapters of two English academic books. He has been successful in gaining funding awards to support her research activities, including a UCD-CSC Scholarship supported by of University College Dublin (UCD) and China Scholarship Council (CSC), a UCD seed funding award, and a ERASMUS plus award of quantitative tools for sustainable food and energy in the food chain (Q-Safe) supported by European Union.

 

Abstract:

The cooking loss (CL) of sweet potato mainly consists of moisture and organic material such as volatile constituents. The primary objective of this research was to demonstrate the superiority of applying near infrared (NIR) hyperspectral imaging and Fourier transform mid infrared (FT-MIR) microspectroscopy for non-destructive determination of sweet potato CL.  Method(s) and Results: Both mentioned NIR and FT-MIR technologies were explored to investigate how constituent elements of sweet potato change during cooking, and in the meantime, to identify sweet potato varieties. Partial least square discriminant analysis (PLSDA) model was established to classify varieties of sweet potato, and the correct classification rate of the PLSDA model using Spectral Set I (964–1645 nm) reached as high as 100%. A few partial least squares regression (PLSR) and support vector machine regression (SVMR) models were developed using different spectral sets and pre-processing methods to detect tuber CL. After, competitive adaptive reweighted sampling (CARS) was introduced to our study to choose incipient feature wavelengths from three spectral subsets related to tuber CL. Based on 8 feature variables selected from Spectral Set I, CARS-SVMR model performed best with the highest coefficient of determination in prediction (R2P) of 0.893 and the lowest root mean square error of prediction (RMSEP) of 0.075. Then, these three subsets of feature wavelengths selected by CARS were re-optimized by using successive projections algorithm (SPA). With 7 feature variables from Spectral Set II (3996–600 cm−1) suggested by CARS-SPA, the CARS-SPA-PLSR model predicted tuber CL with R2P of 0.773 and RMSEP of 0.079. Moreover, the CARS-SPA-PLSR model using 5 wavelengths from Spectral Set I exhibited the best prediction result, with R2P of 0.913 and RMSEP of 0.058.  Conclusions: Although the result obtained in NIR hyperspectral imaging spectroscopy is better than that acquired with FT-MIR microspectroscopy, both techniques are capable of determining sweet potato CL in an indirect but effective way, and the CARS-SPA is an effective approach for feature wavelength extraction.

 

Speaker
Biography:

Abstract:

This research investigated and compared the proximate composition, microscopic and thermal properties of some grains (maize, wheat, and millet), a root crop (cassava) and a leguminous crop (bambara nut) with the intent to formulate novel food product with the desired characteristics for industrial processing. Native cassava flour is known to exhibit physicochemical characteristics that discourages its applications in food systems. However, composite flour formulation and the use of additives have the capacity to encourage the use of unmodified cassava flour to process food of an acceptable standard. Bambara nut is however, a leguminous crop but very high in ash and mineral contents which affects the taste and flavour of products produced from it. Furthermore, the high mineral composition of bambara nut contributes to increased anti-nutrients that contribute to high energy requirement during processing. Thus, these studies were carried out in response to processing needs. The results obtained showed increased starchy materials of the maize grain compared to the other grains while the bambara nut, been a legume, has the least carbohydrate content. Microscopically, the millet flour showed silvered-white indentations that evidenced presence of protein in the intact structure, unlike the other grains. The increased content of protein in the maize could be attributed to increased activity of α-amylase in the maize grain soaked for 48 hrs. The DSC of the flours indicates the A+V-type polymorphs were present in the flours. Wheat and maize flours contained high values of the amylose that could have contributed to the increased values of the enthalpy in their flours, although maturity of the grain during harvest could influence the amylose content and consequently, the enthalpy of foods. The FTIR-Spectroscopic studies showed that the millet flour possessed more ordered structure compared to the other grains. However, the bambara nut flour has the highest ordered structure. Furthermore, cassava with more peaks contained more polymorphs and is expected to possess more complex structure.